When should I consider replacing my Constant Spring?

How do you protect steel from corrosion?

We typically use four methods of protecting carbon steel pipe supports components from corrosion; painting, zinc coatings, hot dip galvanizing, and combinations of these. For an in-depth analysis of each method, click here.

PT&P Aids in the Creation of the "Chemical Island"

February 4, 2001

Piping Technology & Products, Inc. supplied more than 3,000 cold shoes, 400 slide plates and numerous more spring hangers, constants and fabricated pipe supports for the construction of a refinery plant on Jurong Island, Singapore. U.S. Bellows, Inc., also supplied many of the expansion joints used in the creation of this refinery.
Jurong Island is a man-made island consisting of four petroleum refineries, 30 petrochemical firms, and many more industrial firms to support its existence.

Tips on Corrosion Protection
There are four methods of protecting carbon steel pipe support components from corrosion; painting, zinc coatings, hot dip galvanizing, and combinations of these.  Painting has an advantage when appearance and choice of color are important. Modern painting systems may be appropriate protection in certain environments. Paint provides a barrier protection to a metal surface. The ability of zinc to provide cathodic protection for carbon steel in addition to barrier protection is a fundamental advantage. In most cases the reduction in life-cycle costs justifies the small additional cost of galvanizing. Indeed painting and galvanizing together can provide a synergistic benefit which may be justified in some cases.  For more information on corrosion, refer to https://pipingtech.com/resources/technical-bulletins/corrosion-protection/

PT&P’s Diverse Product Testing
Piping Technology & Products, Inc. is a recognized leader in pipe supports, pre-insulated pipe supports, miscellaneous fabrication and expansion joints and has extensive experience with several different types of product testing. This includes :

* Load Testing : The objective of the load test is to determine the maximum load for pipe supports and other products. Load tests are done on an assortment of pipe supports.

* Snubber Testing : The objective of the snubber cycle test is to (1) display the normal wear and tear for a snubber over an extended period of time, and (2) display the resistance to an abrupt disturbance.

* Burst Testing : The objective of the burst test is to determine the ultimate pressure resistance. Primarily conducted on bellows.

See more about testing on our site:  Product Testing

Corrosion Problems? Fight Back with Hot Dip Galvanizing

August 21, 1995

Many piping groups in E&C firms are reviewing their strategies for combating corrosion in piping components. The history of Piping Technology & Products, Inc. has been strongly influenced by industry efforts to combat corrosion, which has always been a major problem at Gulf Coast U.S.A. petrochemical plants. The bolted design we developed for variable springs was originally justified as a quality improvement for hot dipped galvanized finish. This approach allows the spring to be assembled and calibrated with no welding after galvanizing. Prior to this PT&P innovation, the heat from welding could damage both the finish of the welded component and the neoprene coating of the spring coil inside the can. The thousands of springs we have supplied with hot dipped galvanized finish and neoprene-coated coils have proven the validity of this approach as the most cost-effective way to prevent corrosion.

Hot dip galvanizing is a unique process which develops a metallurgical bond of zinc-iron alloy between the zinc coating and the steel product it protects. It provides a continuous layer barrier which physically isolates the steel from the environment. Painting, on the other hand, is a barrier coating which is subject to damage from contact (scratching). Hot dip galvanizing provides a much longer life than painting in corrosive environments partly because zinc forms protective oxide and carbonate films which reduce the rate of corrosion dramatically. Steel exposed to the same environment will corrode at a rate of about twenty-five times the rate of zinc. Zinc also resists accelerated local corrosion even when its outer film has been broken or scratched. The actual rate varies with the electrolyte at the surface.

We provide various types of finishes for corrosion. Contact us for the right finish for your application.


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